Translation strategies

ekrema's picture

Pragmatic failure in translating Arabic implicatures into English

Journal Title, Volume, Page: 
Babel Vol. 62:1 (2016) pp. 21–38
Year of Publication: 
2016
Authors: 
Ekrema Mohammad Shehab
Department of English Language and Literature ,Faculty of humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Department of English Language and Literature ,Faculty of humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it attempts to demonstrate that Arabic utterances involving euphemisms, tautologies and ironies (henceforth Arabic implicatures) lend themselves readily to a Gricean interpretation and, second, it shows how Arabic implicatures in their immediate, social context of use exhibit pragmatic failures when rendered into English. The study examines and analyzes ten Arabic utterances involving implicatures in their original contexts of situation taken from Mahfouz’s (1947) Ziqāqal-Midaq which was translated by LeGassick (1966) into ‘Midaq Alley’, and Ṭayib Ṣaleḥ’s (1969) Mawsimu al-Hijra ila ashShamāl, which was translated by Davies (1969) into ‘the Season of Migration to the North’. The study argues that to avoid pragmatic failure when translating Arabic implicatures into English, emphasis should be placed on conveying the pragmatic import of these utterances by the employment of various translation strategies ranging from those capturing the form and/or function to those capturing the communicative sense independently.

ekrema's picture

Working without Words: The Methods of Translating Open Access Technological Arabic Texts into English

Journal Title, Volume, Page: 
Journal of Linguistics and Literature Studies 02/2014; 2(1):1-10. DOI: 10.13189/11S.2014.020101 ,Horizon Research Publishing .USA
Year of Publication: 
2014
Authors: 
Ekrema Mohammad Shehab
Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
AbdelKarim Daraghmah
Department of English Language and Literature ,Faculty of humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Department of English Language and Literature ,Faculty of humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Amani Ashqar
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

This is a corpus study which demonstrates the difficulties translators encounter when they translate into a target language without an established terminology in the field in question. The purpose of this study is twofold: First, it examines existing methods of translating specialized terminology in technology advertisements/commercials based on three main parameters, namely circulation, recurrence, and audience type. Second, the study proposes certain methods that can be effectively used to render open access specialized technological texts into Arabic for non-specialized audiences. The surveyed texts consist of translations of seventy five of the most visited online website service advertisements. This paper reveals that the text appeal is to be maintained in translation by securing the uninterrupted flow of communication between the service provider and the customer reading the translation. Conformity to the conventions of open access commercial texts and the functionality of those texts remain the main controllers in translating such types of texts.

ekrema's picture

Translating Contextualized Arabic Euphemisms into English: Socio-Cultural Perspective

Journal Title, Volume, Page: 
CSCanada Cross-Cultural Communication 08/2014; Vol 10, (2014)(No 5):pp. 189-198. DOI: 10.3968/4546
Year of Publication: 
2014
Authors: 
Ekrema Mohammad Shehab
Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Abdul-Rahman Qadan
Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Language Center ,Faculty of humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Manar Hussein
Department of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Humanities, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

This study examines the role context plays in determining the translation strategies pursued by  translators of Arabic euphemisms into English. Due to different cultural backgrounds, adherence to the employment of euphemism in a social context may differ in both Arabic and English. While some situations call for the use of euphemism in one culture, the other culture finds no point in using such euphemisms for such situations; preserving the original Arabic euphemisms when rendered into English in this case could lead to misunderstanding and may deprive the Source Language (SL) from a cultural trait. The study derives evidence from 11 Arabic euphemistic expressions taken from five literary masterpieces written by the Egyptian novelist and Noble Prize winner Najib Mahfouz, and it looks into the English translation of these euphemisms. The present study attempts to advance the proposition that Arabic euphemisms in their context exhibit fluctuating, unstable meaning, which emanates from various contextual factors such as speakers, addressees, shared knowledge and background information, and hence these factors combined dictate on translators the chosen translation strategy.

Syndicate content