Stocking

Samahjabi's picture

Antidote Stocking At Hospitals In North Palestine

Journal Title, Volume, Page: 
Online Journal of Health and Allied Sciences, ISSN0972-5997 Volume5, Issue4; Oct-Dec 2006
Year of Publication: 
2007
Authors: 
Ansam F. Sawalha
Poison Control And Drug Information Center (PCDIC), An-Najah National University, P.O. Box 7, Nablus, Palestine
Waleed M. Sweileh
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Sa'ed H. Zyoud
Poison Control and Drug Information Center (PCDIC), An-Najah National University, Nablus, Occupied Palestinian Territory
Samah W. Al-Jabi
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the availability and adequacy of antidote stocking at hospitals in north Palestine based on published guidelines for antidote stocking.
Methodology: This study is a cross sectional survey of all hospitals at north Palestine (n=11) using a questionnaire which was completed by the director of the pharmacy department at each hospital. The questionnaire was divided into 2 parts. The first part contained a list of 25 antidotes while the second part contained a list of 12 antidotes. This classification is based on the guideline proposed by the British Association for Emergency Medicine (BAEM). The net antidote stock results were compared with the American guidelines as well. Result: The overall availability of each antidote in the first list varied widely from zero for glucagon to 100% for atropine. The number antidotes of the first list that were stocked in the 11 hospitals ranged from 5 to 12 antidotes but none of the hospitals stocked all the 25 antidotes. Additionally, availability of antidotes in the second list varied widely from zero for polyethylene glycol to 100% for dobutamine. The number of antidotes stocked ranged from 5 to 9 but none of the hospitals stocked all the 12 antidotes.
Discussion and Conclusion: hospitals in north Palestine do not have adequate stock of antidotes. Raising awareness of the importance of antidotes by education, regular review of antidote storage, distribution plans, and appropriate legislation might provide solutions. Coordination between Palestinian hospitals and the PCDIC at An-Najah National University is also important.

saedzyoud's picture

Antidote Stocking At Hospitals In North Palestine

Journal Title, Volume, Page: 
Online Journal of Health and Allied Sciences
Year of Publication: 
2007
Authors: 
Ansam F. Sawalha
Poison Control And Drug Information Center (PCDIC), An-Najah National University, P.O. Box 7, Nablus, Palestine
Waleed M Sweileh
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Sa'ed H Zyoud
Poison Control And Drug Information Center (PCDIC), An-Najah National University, P.O. Box 7, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Samah W. Al-Jabi
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the availability and adequacy of antidote stocking at hospitals in north Palestine based on published guidelines for antidote stocking.
Methodology: This study is a cross sectional survey of all hospitals at north Palestine (n=11) using a questionnaire which was completed by the director of the pharmacy department at each hospital. The questionnaire was divided into 2 parts. The first part contained a list of 25 antidotes while the second part contained a list of 12 antidotes. This classification is based on the guideline proposed by the British Association for Emergency Medicine (BAEM). The net antidote stock results were compared with the American guidelines as well.
Result: The overall availability of each antidote in the first list varied widely from zero for glucagon to 100% for atropine. The number antidotes of the first list that were stocked in the 11 hospitals ranged from 5 to 12 antidotes but none of the hospitals stocked all the 25 antidotes. Additionally, availability of antidotes in the second list varied widely from zero for polyethylene glycol to 100% for dobutamine. The number of antidotes stocked ranged from 5 to 9 but none of the hospitals stocked all the 12 antidotes.
Discussion and Conclusion: hospitals in north Palestine do not have adequate stock of antidotes. Raising awareness of the importance of antidotes by education, regular review of antidote storage, distribution plans, and appropriate legislation might provide solutions. Coordination between Palestinian hospitals and the PCDIC at An-Najah National University is also important.

ansam's picture

Antidote Stocking At Hospitals In North Palestine

Journal Title, Volume, Page: 
Online Journal Of Health And Allied Sciences Vol 5 Issue 4(4)
Year of Publication: 
2006
Authors: 
Ansam F. Sawalha
Poison Control And Drug Information Center (PCDIC), An-Najah National University, P.O. Box 7, Nablus, Palestine
Current Affiliation: 
Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Waleed M. Sweileh
College Of Pharmacy, Chairman, Clinical Pharmacy Graduate Program, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Sa'ed H. Zyoud
Poison Control And Drug Information Center (PCDIC), An-Najah National University. Nablus, Palestine
Samah W. Al-Jabi
College Of Pharmacy, Chairman, Clinical Pharmacy Graduate Program, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the availability and adequacy of antidote stocking at hospitals in north Palestine based on published guidelines for antidote stocking.
Methodology: This study is a cross sectional survey of all hospitals at north Palestine (n=11) using a questionnaire which was completed by the director of the pharmacy department at each hospital. The questionnaire was divided into 2 parts. The first part contained a list of 25 antidotes while the second part contained a list of 12 antidotes. This classification is based on the guideline proposed by the British Association for Emergency Medicine (BAEM). The net antidote stock results were compared with the American guidelines as well.
Result: The overall availability of each antidote in the first list varied widely from zero for glucagon to 100% for atropine. The number antidotes of the first list that were stocked in the 11 hospitals ranged from 5 to 12 antidotes but none of the hospitals stocked all the 25 antidotes. Additionally, availability of antidotes in the second list varied widely from zero for polyethylene glycol to 100% for dobutamine. The number of antidotes stocked ranged from 5 to 9 but none of the hospitals stocked all the 12 antidotes.
Discussion and Conclusion: hospitals in north Palestine do not have adequate stock of antidotes. Raising awareness of the importance of antidotes by education, regular review of antidote storage, distribution plans, and appropriate legislation might provide solutions. Coordination between Palestinian hospitals and the PCDIC at An-Najah National University is also important.

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