Magnetic Resonance Colonography: Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced Three-Dimensional Vibe With Two- Dimensional FISP Sequences

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Journal Title, Volume, Page: 
Investigative Radiology, Volume 40, Number 2, February 2005
Year of Publication: 
2005
Authors: 
Thomas C. Lauenstein
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Essen, Germany
Waleed Ajaj
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Essen, Germany
Current Affiliation: 
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine
Christiane A. Kuehle
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Essen, Germany
Susanne C. Goehde
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Essen, Germany
Thomas W. Schlosser
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Essen, Germany
Stefan G. Ruehm
Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California at Los Angeles
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a dark-lumen magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) approach with a True FISP-based bright-lumen technique concerning presence of artifacts and the detection rate of colorectal pathologies.
Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients with suspected colorectal lesions were included in this trial. The colon was filled with 2500 mL of tap water. Two-dimensional True FISP datasets as well as T1-weighted GRE sequences (pre- and post-intravenous contrast) were acquired. The detection rate of colorectal masses and inflammatory lesions was determined for both techniques separately. Besides, image quality was assessed. All patients underwent conventional colonoscopy as the standard of reference.
Results: By means of dark-lumen MRC datasets, all polyps >5 mm were correctly diagnosed, whereas 4 polyps <5 mm were missed. Sensitivity of dark-lumen MRC amounted to 78.9%. There were no false-positive results: residual stool could correctly be differentiated from colorectal masses. The True FISP-based bright-lumen MRC, however, failed to detect 2 additional polyps resulting in a sensitivity of 68.4%. Furthermore, bright-lumen MRC led to false-positive results in 5 patients. Both techniques visualized inflammatory bowel disease in 5 patients. However, image quality of True FISP was rated superior to that of dark-lumen MRC.
Conclusion: Dark-lumen MRC proved to be superior over bright-lumen MRC regarding the detection of colorectal masses. However, True FISP imaging can turn out to be helpful as a result of high image quality and motion insensitivity.

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