Human scFv SIgA expressed on Lactococcus lactis as a vector for the treatment of mucosal disease

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Authors: 
Saravanan Yuvaraj
Department of Cell biology, Section Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
Saad Al-Lahham
Department of Cell biology, Section Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
Current Affiliation: 
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah University, Nablus, Palestine.
and othersThe gastrointestinal tract is a complex niche and the main port of entry of many pathogens that trigger a wide range of diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and COLON CANCER. Antibodies are effective for treating such diseases, but a system capable of local delivery at the site of the pathology, thus avoiding systemic side effects, is not yet available. Here we report a novel recombinant scFvSIgA1 protein produced by Lactococcus lactis, anchored to the bacterial membrane, which retains its full immuno-recognizing potential. This scFv fragment employed was specific for a COLON CANCER epitope, epithelial glycoprotein protein-2 (EGP-2). Accordingly L. lactis expressing this chimeric protein was capable of binding cells expressing this epitope. Expression of specific antibodies on bacteria may allow local delivery of anticancer agents produced by such bacteria in conjunction with the antibody and provides a new avenue in the quest for targeted drug delivery.
Preferred Abstract (Original): 

The gastrointestinal tract is a complex niche and the main port of entry of many pathogens that trigger a wide range of diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and COLON CANCER. Antibodies are effective for treating such diseases, but a system capable of local delivery at the site of the pathology, thus avoiding systemic side effects, is not yet available. Here we report a novel recombinant scFvSIgA1 protein produced by Lactococcus lactis, anchored to the bacterial membrane, which retains its full immuno-recognizing potential. This scFv fragment employed was specific for a COLON CANCER epitope, epithelial glycoprotein protein-2 (EGP-2). Accordingly L. lactis expressing this chimeric protein was capable of binding cells expressing this epitope. Expression of specific antibodies on bacteria may allow local delivery of anticancer agents produced by such bacteria in conjunction with the antibody and provides a new avenue in the quest for targeted drug delivery.