Screening of Gastrointestinal Carcinomas Among Palestinian Population

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Type: 
Thesis
Year: 
2003
Students: 
Osama Hamad Ahmad Hamad
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screening_of_gastrointestinal_carcinomas_among_palestinian_population.pdf2.21 MB
Abstract: 
The prevalence of the different gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, in the population of northern West Bank, was investigated depending on the registries of 1000 patients at Al-Watani Hospital — Nablus, during the years 1999-2002. The analysis of the data showed that, while the most frequent single cancer is breast cancer (18.4%), the incidence frequency of all GI cancers was (25.5%). The most frequent GI cancer was liver cancer and then colorectal cancer followed by stomach, oral cavity and pancreatic cancers, respectively. Nablus district occupied the first position in the incidence frequency of GI cancers (47%) followed by Jenin, Tulkarem, Qalqeelia and Salfeet districts, respectively. Further investigation of 141 GI cancer cases showed that GI cancers are more frequent among the older people (55-75 years). This study showed that liver and stomach cancers were inure frequent in males. According to the place of residence, the results revealed that pancreas, colorectal and oral cavity cancers are most frequent in the residents of refugee camps, villages, and cities, respectively. Moreover, the findings of this study showed that pancreas and colorectal cancers are more frequent among housewives, liver cancer is more frequent among employees, and stomach and oral cavity cancers are more frequent among workers. XI As an example of correlations, it was found that the incidence frequencies of pancreas and colorectal cancers are higher in smokers. Furthermore, the results relating the incidence of GI cancers to the presence of chronic diseases(s) in the family members showed that incidence Frequencies of both colorectal and pancreas cancers are higher within the group having family member(s) with chronic disease(s) compared to the group living with healthy members. The results relating the incidence of GI cancers to the presence of first degree relative(s) having cancer showed that incidence frequencies of both colorectal and stomach cancers are higher within the people having cancer diseased relative(s) compared to the people with no family history of cancer. In conclusion, it is clear that the incidence of the different GI cancer types is not affected equally by the same variables and risk factors. Consequently, the effect of each variable should be investigated separately for each GI cancer type since extrapolation of the effect of the same risk factors on all GI cancer types is not always correct.